Dał

A story about a crane and its interrelationship with smaller birds during times of migrations. A traditional story told in Deg Hit’an Athabascan by John Paul.
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Dilja Dimaldu’ K’a Ghetrak

A story about two squirrels that traded parkas. A traditional story told in Deg Hit’an Athabascan by Alta Jerue.
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Dinakinaja Ikatsolnish Mada heye Hondo heye

A storybook about things such as a headband, a fishing hook, keys, socks, rings, airplane, etc.
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Dinakinaja' Ik'ats'itolnish Nidots'o hikogh? Nidots'o dinogholt'aye?

A story about a boy going shopping and learning how much items are, how many he would like, and the total price.
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Dinak’i Ch’its’utozre 2

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Dotron’ Nonot’ok

This story is an adaptation of a North Slope Eskimo fable. A hungry raven mistakes a rock for a caribou.
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K'altsa

A story about a daughter who died and became a fox, then the parents figured it out and they got their daughter back again. A traditional story told in Holikachuk Athabascan by Bertha Rock.
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Mary Ił Gwh Ił

A picture book about a little girl taking care of a rabbit.
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Midisnaka Kwl Henh Ghwlwk

A story about an orphan boy who does not fit in with the other children and what he does to live his life. A traditional story told in Holikachuk Athabascan by Bertha Rock.
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Nok'ołonh Chwh Ghiyoł

This is a story about how the Loch fish (Burbot) came into being. A traditional story told in Holikachuk Athabascan by Hannah Maillelle.
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Nune

A traditional story about a porcupine and beaver told in Deg Hit'an Athabascan by John Paul.
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Tildzidza Hwzoya'

A picture book about a mouse losing a tooth.
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Ts’ima Dzagha’ Dina Hwzoya’

A story about a mother and daughter who encounter a boy made out of spruce pitch.
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Back to Storybook Index

Dał

Dał
Page 2
Page 3
Crane
Page 4
Page 5
In the spring, the crane comes back.
He brings back the little birds.
Page 6
Page 7
He circles above the village.
He makes noise when he circles the village.
Page 8
Page 9
He lets the little birds off where he knows they live.
Page 10
Page 11
He keeps going with those that are going to another place.
He keeps doing that until he has let off all the birds.
Page 12
Page 13
The swan thought, “I should do that too.”
The little birds went to the swan.
Page 14
Page 15
The little birds went to the swan, and it started carrying them; it began to get hungry.
It started to grab for them.
It started to eat them.
Page 16
Page 17
It started letting them off where they were supposed to go.
Page 18
Page 19
The little birds began wondering.
“We’ll not fly with him anymore,
because he got hungry and killed some of us.”
Page 20
Page 21
“We’ll only go back with the crane.”
From this day, the little birds only go with the crane.
Page 22
Page 23
Even if the crane is hungry, he never bothers them.
The crane leaves them alone and stops to eat.
The birds eat too.
Page 24
Page 25
After that they climb on him again and he takes off.
He does that until he has let them all off.
He leaves the birds where they are supposed to go.
They are thankful to him and say he was good to them.
Page 26
Page 27

Dilja Dimaldu’ K’a Ghetrak

Dilja Dimaldu’ K’a Ghetrak
Page 2
Page 3
Red Squirrel Cried for His Parka
Page 4
Page 5
A tree squirrel was walking along.
He met a ground squirrel
Page 6
Page 7
He came down to him from the mountains.
Page 8
Page 9
“What a nice parka you’re wearing,” he told him.
The tree squirrel told him that.
Page 10
Page 11
He said to him, “You have a nice parka too.”
Page 12
Page 13
Then he (the squirrel) said to him,
“I’ll wear your parka, and you’ll wear mine,” he said to him.
Page 14
Page 15
The ground squirrel was in favor of it.
He took it off and gave it to him.
Page 16
Page 17
“When the sun goes down, I’ll go home,” said the ground squirrel.
The tree squirrel said, “When the sun goes down, I’ll go home too.”
Page 18
Page 19
They walked around.
Page 20
Page 21
Finally the sun started going down.
The tree squirrel said, “Give me back my parka.”
Page 22
Page 23
The ground squirrel told him, “No.”
“I will not give it to you,” he said to him.
“I’m going home right now.
I’m going back to the mountains.”
Page 24
Page 25
“Give me my parka,” he asked him.
The tree squirrel kept asking him.
Page 26
Page 27
“No,” he would say. “I’m going home.”
Finally he left.
Page 28
Page 29
The tree squirrel began crying.
He cried all night for his parka.
Page 30
Page 31
When it began to get light, he stopped crying.
“What am I crying for?
He will never give it back to me.”
Page 32
Page 33
“I’m going back home, too,” he said, and he left.
Page 34
Page 35
That is why the tree squirrel looks as if it has cried a lot.
It cried for its parka.
That is the end. That is all.
Page 36
Page 37

Dinakinaja Ikatsolnish Mada heye Hondo heye

Dinakinaja Ikatsolnish Mada heye Hondo heye
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Headband
My mom found headband under the table.
Whose is this?
It’s Fred’s.
It’s Fred’s headband.
Page 6
Page 7
Gloves
Mary Ann saw four gloves hanging.
Which one is mine? she said.
Is this big one mine?
Is this small one mine?
Page 8
Page 9
Coats
Three coats are on the floor.
My mom is looking at them.
She said, whose coats are these?
Is it my son Floyd’s coat? she said.
Is it my daughter Christina’s coat? she said.
Page 10
Page 11
Shoes
Ivan bought a new shoes.
“Which shoes did you buy,” his mom asked
“Did you buy tennis shoes?
Did you buy leather shoes?”
Page 12
Page 13
Page 14
Page 15
Key
My mom wants to go into the cache.
She is looking for the cache keys.
Which key is she going to use?
Is she going to use the biggest key?
Page 16
Page 17
Paper
The teacher is looking over what the children worked on.
She found one paper with no name on it.
Whose paper is this? she asked.
Nellie said, it’s mine.
Page 18
Page 19
Page 20
Page 21
Using a pencil
The children are writing news.
They are using pencil.
Looks like Linda’s need sharpening.
Whose need sharpening?
Page 22
Page 23
Combs
Pauline is going to comb her hair.
There are five combs on the dresser.
Which one will Pauline use?
Is she going to use the biggest one?
Page 24
Page 25
Page 26
Page 27
Page 28
Page 29
Page 30
Page 31
Tape Player
Shirley told her younger sister she bought a new player.
Her sister asked, for me?
Is it a small one?
Who made it?
Page 32
Page 33
Clock
My dad bought two clock.
Two different size.
Gladys asked, can I have one?
Her dad asked, which one do you want?
Page 34
Page 35
Page 36
Page 37
Airplane
Two airplanes landed.
Billy is looking at them.
I don’t know whose it is, he said.
Maybe it’s Wein’s airplane.
Page 38
Page 39
Drying racks
Here are two drying racks.
There are poles everywhere.
What about here.
Susan asked, “where there a lot of animals.”
“Where there are a lot of trees there are lots of animals,” he dad said.
Page 40
Page 41
Knives
My dad saw two knives.
He asked, “whose is this black one?”
Billy said, “it was John’s.”
“Which one is sharp?”
Page 42
Page 43
Hook
Irma found hook in the porch.
Whose is this? she said.
It’s Marvin’s
It’s Marvin’s hook.
Page 44
Page 45

Dinakinaja' Ik'ats'itolnish Nidots'o hikogh? Nidots'o dinogholt'aye?

Dinakinaja' Ik'ats'itolnish Nidots'o hikogh? Nidots'o dinogholt'aye?
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Here is sugar.
You want sugar?
Yes, I want sugar.
Page 6
Page 7
How much does it cost?
One pound cost 65 cents.
How much do you want?
Page 8
Page 9
I want 10 pounds.
How much would it cost?
You will pay $6.50.
Page 10
Page 11
Put in the box.
Page 12
Page 13
Here is milk.
You want milk?
Yes, I want milk.
Page 14
Page 15
Page 16
Page 17
I want five.
How much does it cost?
You will pay $3.70.
Page 18
Page 19
Put them in the box.
Page 20
Page 21
Here is coffee.
You want coffee?
Yes, I want coffee.
Page 22
Page 23
How much does it cost?
One pound is $3.00
How much do you want?
Page 24
Page 25
I want two pounds.
How much would it cost?
You will pay $6.00.
Page 26
Page 27
Put it in the box.
Page 28
Page 29
Here is flour.
You want flour?
Yes, I want flour.
Page 30
Page 31
How much does it cost?
One pound cost 36 cents.
How much do you want?
Page 32
Page 33
I want twenty pounds.
How much does it cost?
You will pay $7.20.
Page 34
Page 35
Put it in the box.
Page 36
Page 37
Here is gasoline.
You want gasoline?
Yes, I want gasoline.
Page 38
Page 39
How much does it cost?
One gallon cost $1.60.
How much do you want?
Page 40
Page 41
I want five gallons.
How much does it cost?
You will pay $8.00.
Page 42
Page 43
Put it in the box.
Page 44
Page 45
Here is hand soap.
You want hand soap?
Yes, I want hand soap.
Page 46
Page 47
Page 48
Page 49
I want three hand soap.
How much does it cost?
You will pay $2.67.
Page 50
Page 51
Put them in the box.
Page 52
Page 53
Here is crackers.
You want crackers?
Yes, I want crackers.
Page 54
Page 55
Page 56
Page 57
I want two boxes.
How much would it cost?
You will pay $5.00.
Page 58
Page 59
Put it in the box.
Page 60
Page 61
Here is ammunition.
You want ammunition?
Yes, I want ammunition.
Page 62
Page 63
Page 64
Page 65
Page 66
Page 67
Put it in the box.
Page 68
Page 69
Here is jam.
You want jam?
Yes, I want jam.
Page 70
Page 71
Page 72
Page 73
Page 74
Page 75
Put them in the box.
Page 76
Page 77
Here is stove oil.
You want stove oil?
Yes, I want stove oil.
Page 78
Page 79
Page 80
Page 81
Page 82
Page 83
Put them by the box.
Do you know how much I paid for these?
It cost too much.
Page 84
Page 85

Dinak’i Ch’its’utozre 2

Dinak’i Ch’its’utozre 2
Page 2
Page 3
Dog
Where is the dog?
Dog is sitting on an island.
Dog wants bone.
Bone.
Dog wants bone.
Where is bone?
Page 4
Page 5
Beaver
Where is beaver?
There is a beaver.
Beaver is walking down.
Arrows
Lots of arrows.
You want arrows?
I want arrows.
Page 6
Page 7
Rabbit
Look! Rabbit!
Rabbit hopping along the bank.
Rabbit hopped down.
Rope
Here is rope.
Long rope.
Page 8
Page 9
Beaver
There is beaver
Where did the beaver go?
Beaver walked down.
Lake
Look! Lake!
It’s a big lake.
Page 10
Page 11
Page 12
Page 13
Page 14
Page 15
Page 16
Page 17
Page 18
Page 19
Page 20
Page 21
Page 22
Page 23
Baby
Where is the baby?
There is the baby.
It’s a small baby.
Plate
Here is plate.
Big plate.
I want plate.
Page 24
Page 25
Snowshoe
Where is snowshoe?
Here is snowshoe.
It’s a big snowshoe.
Berry
Look! Berry!
Lots of berries.
Page 26
Page 27
Marten
Here is marten.
The man said he wants a marten.
Fish eggs
K’un’ ui choh.
Lots of fish eggs.
Fish eggs in a plate.
You want fish eggs?
Page 28
Page 29
Nest
Here is a nest.
It’s a big nest.
Nest in a tree.
Bird
Look! Bird!
What is the bird doing?
The bird is sitting.
Page 30
Page 31
Boat
Where is the boat?
There’s the boat.
The boat is floating.
It’s foot
Here is its foot.
Its foot is hurting.
Page 32
Page 33
Page 34
Page 35
Page 36
Page 37
Page 38
Page 39
Page 40
Page 41
Page 42
Page 43
Page 44
Page 45
Page 46
Page 47
With it
Floating (back and forth)
Woke up
Hungry
Back in the woods
Looking at
House
Sitting
Saw
Two people
Page 48
Page 49
Page 50
Page 51
Page 52
Page 53
Went in
Dry fish
Took some
Started back down
Slipped
Fell down
Fell down on top of him/her
Smashed
Died
Page 54
Page 55
Big, large
Again, more
He is singing
She missed it
He took it
Story
Piece of bark
Nest
Bird’s breastbone
Crane
Page 56
Page 57
She grabbed it
It turned red
He is hungry
Stick
All of it
He sees it there
To possess
He climbed up (ladder)
He climbed up (bank)
It is there
Page 58
Page 59
What is he doing?
Up off the ground
Cache
Day
Bird
But
Baby
Guga’hwdalah
Ducklings
Little, small
Rabbit
Page 60
Page 61
The edge
It is jumping
I don’t know
Grease
Small
He went to sleep
Where? (person)
Canadian goose
They were making it
It is there
Page 62
Page 63
Finally
White place
How much
River
Looking around
Bumping the shore
Location
Toward
He is jumping toward
Then
Page 64
Page 65
Then seeing it
Just that much
With
He smells it
It is
Really
Blueberries
Ladder
He slipped
I will lie down
Page 66
Page 67
Cabin, house
Upon it
Do you want it?
Fox
Arrow
Fish eggs
Now
Many
He is angry
End of his tail
Page 68
Page 69
With him
His foot
It fell on him
He slept
Lake
Ahead of it
His mother
Look, see
He was smashed
He is swimming
Page 70
Page 71
Many, much
How
It is
Ground
He fell down
Females
He began to climb down
Two (people)
Snowshoes
Marten
Page 72
Page 73
They are playing
He is tired
He began to jump away
He sees it
Mouse
It is long
Night
They jumped into water
Swan
The one floating
Page 74
Page 75
It is floating
Ducks
Rope
Boat
He died
Beaver
He woke up
And
One person
Bone
Page 76
Page 77
Plate
All the time
Inside
It tried to hit it
It went inside
It ran toward them
It climbed up
Eagle
Up there
Up
Page 78
Page 79
Dry fish
Page 80
Page 81

Dotron’ Nonot’ok

Dotron’ Nonot’ok
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
The raven wants food so he starts to fly around.
Page 6
Page 7
He is flying along the river and he’s still hungry.
Page 8
Page 9
He sees three caribou and becomes happy.
So he began to think, “How can I get to them?”
Page 10
Page 11
“I see the fattest one standing there,” he says.
Page 12
Page 13
He flies slowly toward it.
Page 14
Page 15
“I’ll kill it with my beak in his heart,” he says.
Page 16
Page 17
He hit it as hard as he could.
Page 18
Page 19
He knocked himself out.
Page 20
Page 21
When he came to, he said, “Ouch! My beak!”.
Page 22
Page 23
He is dizzy as he flies away.
“Adzigee! I thought those stones were caribou,” he says.
Page 24
Page 25

K'altsa

K'altsa
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
The child of two people who were living together died.
The little girl grew up.
And then she died.
Page 6
Page 7
When the father would go to the fishtrap,
A fox would be running around.
But he would leave it alone.
Page 8
Page 9
Once in a while he would feed it.
He would take the fish from the trap.
He would feed it some blackfish.
Page 10
Page 11
He had set a fish trap.
He fed it some blackfish.
He would feed it whenever he went to the trap.
Page 12
Page 13
Whenever the couple would go to bed, somebody would be snoring across from them.
It had come inside.
Page 14
Page 15
The place where the snoring was coming from was covered.
It was covered with a fox skin.
Page 16
Page 17
“What will we do tomorrow?” they asked each other.
“We’ll bring in some fish eggs,” he told her.
“One of us will smear it with fish eggs and the other one will grab it.”
Page 18
Page 19
“We’ll grab the fox skin that covers it,” he told her.
That is what they did.
They grabbed it and smeared it up.
Page 20
Page 21
Page 22
Page 23
“There’s going to be a potlatch,” they said.
Everybody was cooking.
They made ice cream and everything.
Page 24
Page 25
They became thankful.
They did good things because they were thankful she had returned. They were thankful for getting her back.
Page 26
Page 27

Mary Ił Gwh Ił

Mary Ił Gwh Ił
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
One day, Mary’s dad was hunting.
Mary was always waiting for him when he went out hunting.
Now she asked her mom how far her dad walked.
Page 6
Page 7
Her mom smiling, “he just left, how fast do you think he’ll walk back,” she told her.
“I want him to walk back fast,” she told her mom.
“Wonder what he’ll come back with.”
It was a long day with Mary.
Page 8
Page 9
It was dinnertime in the evening when her dad walked back in.
Mary was happy then.
“What did you bring back?” she asked her dad.
Page 10
Page 11
He took his coat off.
Mary was watching when he hung his coat.
Then something moved in his pocket.
Her dad was smiling when this happened.
“What did you bring back?” she asked her dad again.
“Look in my pocket,” he told Mary.
Page 12
Page 13
Slowly she looked in there.
She can only see two eyes glowing.
Her dad dug in the pocket and took out baby rabbit.
“I only brought this back,” he said.
Page 14
Page 15
For Mary, he made a house for rabbit.
For a while the rabbit was scared.
But Mary was treating the rabbit good, so it wasn’t scared anymore.
Page 16
Page 17
Mary really cared for the rabbit, but didn’t know what to feed it.
She was trying to feed it her food.
She didn’t know it doesn’t eat that kind of food.
Page 18
Page 19
Her dad told her, “Don’t try to feed it that kind of food.
Rabbit doesn’t eat that kind of food.
We’ll get plants for it.
Maybe he’ll like that kind.”
Page 20
Page 21
Finally winter was over.
The rabbit got big.
It was almost bigger than its house.
“We should release it.”
One day her dad told her. “It’s a forest animal.”
Page 22
Page 23
She held it for a long time and finally released it.
It was hopping around sniffing the ground.
Looks like it was hungry.
Finally it ran off.
Since then every time Mary sees a rabbit she would wonder if that was her rabbit.
Page 24
Page 25

Midisnaka Kwl Henh Ghwlwk

Midisnaka Kwl Henh Ghwlwk
Page 2
Page 3
The Poor Orphan
Page 4
Page 5
Once there was an orphan boy who had no mother or father.
His grandmother raised him.
Page 6
Page 7
Some children were playing.
The boy did not like any of the other boys and girls.
Page 8
Page 9
There was one girl who was also an orphan.
She was the only one he liked.
Page 10
Page 11
There was a play area outside.
They gathered there again in the dark.
Page 12
Page 13
They were playing games, But the boy did not like any of the other children.
Page 14
Page 15
“I should go to the smokehouse,” he thought.
“I can take some dried fish eggs from the top of the pile and put them on my head,” he thought.
Page 16
Page 17
He ran home and went into the smokehouse.
Page 18
Page 19
He put some dried fish eggs on the crown of his head.
He put his hat on over them.
Page 20
Page 21
A bunch of children came to him again.
“Gee, who stinks?” they said to one another.
Page 22
Page 23
Then they all left him.
He ran back inside.
Page 24
Page 25
He told the one girl that he liked her because she was an orphan like himself.
Page 26
Page 27
Then he told his grandmother, “She’s the only one I like,” he said.
“Yes, she’s like you,” she said.
Page 28
Page 29
He washed his head.
He washed his head well and took her [as his wife].
Page 30
Page 31
They started a good life, working together.
Page 32
Page 33
Meanwhile, the others said, “She married somebody who stinks.”
They were complaining because he had put fish eggs on his head.
Page 34
Page 35
They laughed at her.
They said to her, “Who would marry a person like that, somebody who stinks?” they said to her.
Page 36
Page 37
In the meantime, he stopped smelling so bad; he had washed his head.
They lived well.
They had one baby.
Page 38
Page 39
They worked well together.
Page 40
Page 41
Their grandmother was very thankful for them.
“You did the right thing, taking an orphan like yourself,” she told him.
“I’m very thankful,” she told him.
Page 42
Page 43

Nok'ołonh Chwh Ghiyoł

Nok'ołonh Chwh Ghiyoł
Page 2
Page 3
The Big Woman is Walking Along
Page 4
Page 5
They say that a big woman was walking along.
She was walking along.
Page 6
Page 7
Then she became hungry.
“I’m hungry,” she said, yelling out loud.
Page 8
Page 9
She continued to walk along.
Then she came upon two caches.
Page 10
Page 11
She went into one of them and began eating.
She ate up everything in it.
Page 12
Page 13
She also went up into the other cache.
She ate up everything in that one, too. Then she left.
Page 14
Page 15
She was walking along.
Then she began to get thirsty.
“I want water,” she said, shouting out loud.
Page 16
Page 17
Then she came upon a lake.
She began to drink the water in it.
She drank all the water out of the lake.
Page 18
Page 19
Then she started walking again.
She walked down to the shore.
She saw water flowing.
She went up to where a big fire was burning.
Page 20
Page 21
She lay down by the fire.
She lay down with her stomach facing the fire.
She went to sleep.
Page 22
Page 23
Suddenly she jumped up out of her sleep.
Her stomach had cooked until it burst.
Water poured out of it.
Page 24
Page 25
It became a creek.
She rolled into the water.
She turned into a loch.
She swam away.
That is all of the story.
Page 26
Page 27

Nune

Nune
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
A porcupine was staying on the other side of the river.
It was eating a lot.
It was staying far across the river.
Page 8
Page 9
It was thinking.
“I want to go on the hill on the other side of the river,” it thought.
Page 10
Page 11
Finally, it started walking.
It went to the shore of the Yukon River.
Page 12
Page 13
It looked and looked across the river.
It bowed its head.
Page 14
Page 15
Suddenly, the water splashed.
Apparently it was a beaver slapping its tail.
Page 16
Page 17
It [the porcupine] looked toward it.
Then it made a squeaking sound.
Page 18
Page 19
The beaver looked toward it.
The beaver asked it, “Why are you sitting there?”
Page 20
Page 21
“I want someone to take me to the other side,” it said to it.
“I want to go to the hill,” it told it.
Page 22
Page 23
The beaver told it, “Come, get on my back.”
“I will take you across,” it said to it.
Page 24
Page 25
The beaver asked it, “Which direction do you want me to go?”
“Straight across,” it answered.
Page 26
Page 27
It began to swim across with it.
The river was too wide, and the beaver began to get tired.
It started panting, but kept on swimming.
Page 28
Page 29
When it swam ashore, it was facing upstream.
“Go on, go up the bank,” it told the porcupine.
Page 30
Page 31
The beaver’s fat melted down to its stomach.
The porcupine’s fat melted up to its back.
Page 32
Page 33

Tildzidza Hwzoya'

Tildzidza Hwzoya'
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Mouse Story
Page 6
Page 7
A mouse was walking along.
He was walking upstream.
He was walking upstream on the beach.
Page 8
Page 9
He thought, “What will I do?”
Suddenly he thought of his tooth.
He took out his tooth.
Page 10
Page 11
He took a tooth out of his mouth.
He started to play with it.
Page 12
Page 13
Then it fell to the ground away from him.
Page 14
Page 15
He looked for it.
It was gone.
Page 16
Page 17
He searched there a long time.
He could not find it.
Page 18
Page 19
Then he got mad, and he angrily took off upriver.
Page 20
Page 21
He was walking angrily upriver on the beach.
He walked upriver.
He looked back.
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Back downriver, there was a little mountain from which smoke was rising.
He started looking at it and he thought about it.
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“I should go toward it,” he thought.
He started to go toward it.
He started walking back downstream toward it.
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He was walking toward it.
He was looking at it.
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There were berries on it.
All the different kinds of berries were on it.
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He went up to it and began eating the berries.
He ate up all the berries on it.
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He walked around the hill.
At that place, there was a mouse hole visible.
He went squeaking away into it.
That is all.
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Ts’ima Dzagha’ Dina Hwzoya’

Ts’ima Dzagha’ Dina Hwzoya’
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Spruce-Pitch Man Story
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They say that a mother and daughter were living together.
They were helping each other work with a fishnet.
They lived there and never saw any other people.
They lived on the edge of the ocean.
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They did not know any people.
They had a canoe.
Every spring they would put spruce pitch on it.
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They would go back into the woods for the pitch.
They would melt it.
They would pitch the canoe.
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Afterward they would put the fishnet in the water.
They would go fishing.
It was springtime again.
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“I should go back into the woods by myself,” the girl told her mother.
“I should go back alone for pitch,” she told her.
“You stay here and work on the fishnet,” she told her.
Then she took a birchbark basket and started going back into the woods.
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She walked among the big spruce trees.
She gathered spruce pitch.
“Well, this is pretty good for our old canoe.
It’s pretty good,” she said, she thought.
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Then she thought, “I’ll go back now,”
And she started walking back out.
“Do you like me?” somebody said.
She became frightened.
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“Who could that be?” she thought.
“I didn’t know that there was anybody around,” she thought.
She looked all around.
Nobody was there.
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She looked among the willows and standing trees.
Nobody was there.
Then she started to go back home again.
“Do you like me?” somebody said.
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She stopped again.
She looked up among the branches.
Way up in the fork of the spruce tree, someone was sitting, a boy.
A boy was sitting up there.
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“Is that you who said that?” she asked him.
“Do you like me?” he asked her.
The girl told him, “Yes.”
“I want you,” she told him.
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He came down to her and went back out of the woods with her.
He went back out of the woods with her and went into the house with her.
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Her mother did not even ask who he was.
He went across the room from them.
He started staying there.
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He dug a hole and started sitting in it.
He sat in the hole.
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He would not go out in the daytime, but only at night.
He would get up.
He would walk around outside.
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The mother and daughter used spruce pitch on their boat.
She would melt the pitch and they would pitch the boat.
Then that man got up.
He got up and went outside.
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He told them to go get some inner bark.
They began to gather it.
They gathered a lot of bark.
After that he told them what to do.
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They tore them into strands.
He told them, “Braid it like this.”
They started braiding it. They braided.
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They braided it until they made a big ball.
They said, “Come and see this.”
He only went out to look at it in the evening.
During the day he would stay inside and sleep the whole day.
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“That’s not enough, braid more,” he told them.
They continued braiding.
It became very big.
He said, “No more, it is big enough.”
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In the evening he said, “Okay, now take it down and tie it to the canoe.”
He told this to the girl.
“Stay on the shore by the rope,” he told her.
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Her mother went back up the bank.
She went back into the house.
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The boy began paddling upriver in the evening.
He began paddling upriver.
The girl sat by the ball of rope that was tied to the canoe.
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The whole night went by while she sat by it.
He told her to let out the rope for him.
She let the rope out as he paddled upstream.
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Then he told her,
“When you get to the end, start pulling it back,” he told her.
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“Rewind it into a ball,” he told her.
She started doing that.
It was close to morning when he came drifting back to her.
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He got a lot of seals.
They were even tied on the side of his canoe.
Also in the canoe.
He landed the canoe.
He landed just before the sun rose.
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The mother got up, and that girl did too.
All day long they skinned them.
They put them away while he slept in the house.
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Then it became evening again.
He went outside again.
Then he went outside and did what he had done the day before.
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“I’m going to paddle upriver,” he said.
The girl went back down to the edge of the water.
She went down to the edge of the water and started sitting there.
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She was sleepy.
She had not slept the day before.
She started to get very sleepy.
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She was supposed to be holding the rope.
The boy went back upriver.
Her mother should have gone out to her.
Her mother went back up and into the house and went to sleep.
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While the girl was sitting at the edge of the water, she fell asleep.
“Pull the rope back,” he had told her.
She fell asleep.
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The sun came up. The sun came way up, and then the girl woke up suddenly.
She woke up suddenly and started pulling the rope, but it was light.
It was very light.
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As she was pulling the rope, the canoe came toward her and nobody was inside it.
Nobody was in it when it came to the shore.
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She started to call him, but she never found him.
The boy was gone.
What happened to him?
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Then she started looking in the canoe.
Way up in the front, there was a little lump.
She looked at it closely.
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It was a pile of pitch gum in the front.
Then she began to cry.
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She sat at the edge of the water and cried.
The boy had turned back into a pile of pitch gum.
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